Friday, December 23, 2011

Rhyme Tree

After reading a thematically-related storybook,  client identified and "picked" rhyming pairs of apples and put them in the basket.

Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduate clinician, Halie Clark.

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Initial Sound Identification

Have children say the names of the items at the top of each strip and identify the first sound in each word.  Then have them sort a pile of various images according to initial sound and place it on the corresponding strip.  


Tuesday, December 6, 2011

The Five Senses Vocabulary

This activity targets vocabulary associated with the five senses: ears/hear, mouth/taste, hands/touch, nose/smell, eyes/see.  It is a silly and fun part-to-whole felt board activity that can be modified for various activities.  We used it to accompany a song about the senses.  Each child got one of the associated body parts and was allowed to add it to the face when that sense appeared in the song.


Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduate clinician Kayla Fontenot.

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

If You Give a Mouse a Cookie - Sound Blending

Make vocabulary words on cookies with the first letter detachable with 
Velcro.  Go through selected vocabulary words from If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff to familiarize clients with the vocabulary. Then detach the first sound from the cookies and have the clients determine which sound and letter belongs in the empty space. They can then "give the mouse a cookie" (featured with a miniature garbage can in this picture).


Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduates  Jennifer Yancey, Karen Whisenhunt Saar, Kim Hudler, and Kayla Fontenot.

Sound Identification and Sound Blending

The first sound in each word was missing so children could practice creating different words by replacing that first sound. Clinician asked clients questions such as, "If you have the word "see" and replace the /s/ sound withthe /b/ sound, what is the new word?" 


Be sure to say the sound of the letter and not the name. 

Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology alumni Jennifer Yancey, Karen Whisenhunt Saar, Kim Hudler, and Kayla Fontenot.

Sound Blending and Segmenting Folder Activity

The short "a" sound was targeted in the classroom the week this activity was used in therapy so all of the CVC words contained the short "a" sound (cat, tap, mat, cap, map, sap, sat, bat, pat, and nap).  Initially the client went through the words only changing the first letter on the rime "-at."  Clients were asked to say what the word would be when each initial sound changed.  After this activity was completed it was repeated by keeping the onset but changing the rime.  For example, "sa-" would be constant but the clients would be asked to add the t and then the p to the end of the word to make different words.

Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduates Jennifer Yancey, Karen Whisenhunt Saar, Kim Hudler, and Kayla Fontenot.



Word Analysis and Vocabulary Activities for "Little Red Hen"

After reading The Little Red Hen, this word analysis file folder activity was used to have children help tell the story by filling in the blanks.  


These puppets were used for a dramatic play vocabulary activity.  Each character was associated with vocabulary verb from the story, such as play, sleep, plant, etc.  Each child in the group was assigned a puppet and the group collectively retold the story, acting out their characters part using the puppets.


Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduates Jennifer Yancey, Karen Whisenhunt Saar, Kim Hudler, and Kayla Fontenot.

Sound Blending with Dog Bones



This sound blending activity accompanied a lesson designed around Spike Lee's book, Please, Puppy, Please.  CVC (and a few other vocabulary) words such as like, puppy, me (cv), gate, feed, wash, mine, call, tub, cat, walk, fetch (cvcc) were printed onto dog bone shaped pieces.  Children were given two to five words to identify at a time.  Once the missing initial sound was identified, they were prompted to find the corresponding letter to Velcro on to the bone.  After they combined the initial consonant with the rest of the word, they were allowed to feed the puppy the bones after they were correctly completed. (A pail decorated as a puppy as seen below)



Word Analysis Activity for Please, Puppy, Please by Spike Lee

After reading Please, Puppy, Please by Spike Lee and reviewing vocabulary, use this word analysis activity to have children fill in the sentence blanks.  Related images can provide a helpful cue as a step-down in complexity.

Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduates Jennifer Yancey, Karen Whisenhunt Saar, Kim Hudler, and Kayla Fontenot.

Word Tracing and Copying


First children were given an overlay for the top of the paper that matched the bottom but had the word puppy filled in.  They were instructed to copy the word, letter by letter, into the blanks on their papers.  Later they were asked to trace the vocabulary word at the top of the page by connecting the dots of each letter to practice writing.


Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduates Kim Hudler, Jennifer Yancey, Karen Whisenhunt Saar, and Kayla Fontenot.

Letter Awareness, Sound Identification, & Letter Naming Puppy-Themed Craft







 -letter inventory s p m f
-match upper and lower case letters
-name letters
-ID sound of each letter







Each child gets an 4 rhinestones that have lower case versions of the target letters written on them. They will be asked to identify the letters on the
stones. “What letter is this?” “What sound does that letter make?”

Then they will be directed to the construction paper "collar" and for each rhinestone asked, “Can you find
the partner for this letter?” Then they will glue it on to the corresponding place. They will then glue their puppy collars on the puppy.



Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduates Jennifer Yancey, Karen Whisenhunt Saar, Kim Hudler, and Kayla Fontenot.

Sound Identification

After reading the story Please, Puppy, Please by Spike Lee, clients helped complete the sentences in this folder activity.  They were then prompted to identify the first sounds in the key words and then match them to their corresponding letters.


Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduates Jennifer Yancey, Karen Whisenhunt Saar, Kim Hudler, and Kayla Fontenot.

Sound Identification

The sets of pictures below were used for various sound identification games.  For instance, children were asked to find every word that starts with /m/ and give it to a moose and discard the others in a pail.  Games such as Go Fish can be played with sets of these cards, as well.

                     " Find objects that start with /s/."                                           "Find objects that start with /m/."

Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology alumni Jennifer Yancey, Karen Whisenhunt Saar, Kim Hudler, and Kayla Fontenot.

Word Analysis for If You Give a Mouse a Cookie

Word analysis folder activity with vocabulary from If You Give a Mouse a Cookie.  After reviewing the story and vocabulary have children help fill in the sentence blanks.

Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduates Jennifer Yancey, Karen Whisenhunt Saar, Kim Hudler, and Kayla Fontenot.

Monday, November 14, 2011

Stuttering therapy materials for easy onset

I created this easy onset graphic to introduce the concept of easying through the vowel to the consonant (good for adolescent clients who stutter). I have the client slide their finger along the graph to the consonant. The easy onset table is seperated by linguistic level of complexity. The sentence portion has spaces to encourage phrasing to decrease rate. Attached are also light loose consonant tables for all stops and bilabials.


by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduate, Kelli Renfro, M.S.

Sunday, November 13, 2011

The Hungry Giant's Soup by Joy Cowley targeting sequencing, verbs, opposites

Make soup follow-up activity to work on sequencing and verbs (i.e., cut, stir, cry etc.). You can pretend play and make a small vs. large soup and eat with a "giant" spoon. Work on opposites big/small or hot/cold. The kids can classify food as hot or cold.



Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduate, Kelli Renfro, M.S.

The Hungry Giant by Joy Cowley targeting vocabulary & prepositions

The Hungry Giant

Great follow-up activities to review vocabulary. Go on a bee hunt for vocabulary and have them look "under/in/behind" to target prepositions too! Can incorporate bees by talking about where they live or the process of making honey.

The sandwich is great for targeting vocabulary and sequencing task.

Materials for bee hive include: yellow paper lantern, brown paint, and printed
bees, magnets/velcro.



Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduate, Kelli Renfro, M.S.

Saturday, November 12, 2011

Miss Wishy Washy's Splishy Sploshy targeting vocabulary, present progressive, plurals

We used these items to target plural /s/, present progressive /ing/, increasing vocab, and final consonants (k, g, p, b), as well as distinguishing dirty/clean. We read through the book and identified our sounds in words from the book. We then went back over the vocabulary with the cards in the third picture. At the end of our session we put together the large "Meanie," using plural /s/ for body parts, /ing/ for painting, and dirty/clean.




Material adapted from Miss Wishy Washy's Splishy Sploshy by Jow Cowley and created by Lamar University SLP graduate clinician, Samantha Bourgeois. 

Present Progressive and plurals using The Jigaree

Use the Jigaree to target present progressive (ing) and plural /s/. Target words such as jumping, climbing, dancing, swimming, falling, flying, etc. At the end of the session we put together a large Jigaree. We used the body parts to target plural /s/. For example, "What does he need next?"  "He needs arms."



Material adapted from The Jigaree by Jow Cowley and created by Lamar University SLP graduate clinician, Samantha Bourgeois. 

A Chair For My Mother language unit

A CHAIR FOR MY MOTHER: 

I did a series of different activities over a few weeks with this book. 

  • First, I took the child "to the diner" by gathering play food and play plates and silverware. We had a menu printed off that we were allowed to order from and be served by a waitress that we "paid." The mother works at the diner so this was a good follow-up activity for building semantic relationships. 
  • Secondly, I brought a jar and some play coins and allowed the child to earn coins throughout the session to start saving as if they were part of the story saving for the chair. 
  • Thirdly, we counted the money in our jar just as the girl and her mother counted it every night. 
  • Fouth, we had an activity where I set out food and beverage items one would find at the store and allowed the child to go "grocery shopping" and "pay" for the items in his basket. 
  • Fifth, the child and clinician pretended to go shoe shopping. Pictures of the shoes shown were given to the child to "buy" his own shoes. 
  • Sixth, the child got to put fire flames on the old house, have a fire truck show up, a firefighter spray the house, and then show that it turned black using the black backgroud
  • Seventh, after the firefighter, the neighbors came to the new house and brought a table set, bed, some food, and pots and pans. These were all laminated cut-outs.
  • Eighth, we took our "full" jar of coins and practiced taking it to the bank, rolling the coins in coin rollers, and exchanging the coins for bills. 
  • Ninth, the child got to decorate their own chair in the likeness of the one in the book. 
  • Tenth, the child got to take the stick figure creations and take them to the store to try the different chairs before selecting the one they wanted originally.
  • The child and Clinician, I also went over different parts of a community and the buildings in a community. (Examples: bank, school, drug store, gas station, grocery store, etc.) 





Material adapted from A Chair For My Mother by Vera Williams and created by Lamar University SLP   graduate clinician, Destinee Hedspeth.  Artwork by Vera Williams.

Very Hungry Caterpillar free downloadables

Very Hungry Caterpillar free downloadable images to use for sequencing and vocabulary.

http://www.dltk-kids.com/t_template.asp?t=http://www.dltk-teach.com/books/hungrycaterpillar/csequencing.gif


Submitted by Lamar University SLP   graduate clinician, Kim Hudler.

Sunday, November 6, 2011

Sequencing, Present Progressive, & Prepositions




That meany is splashing paint "on" the walls and floor and "under" the table.  Poor Mrs. Wishy Washy is scrubbing and cleaning up that mess!  Use felt, velcro or magnetic paper to create an interactive set that kids can use to sequence and retell the story, practice using progressive (-ing) verbs, and practice using prepositions.

Material adapted from Splishy Sploshy by Joy Cowley and created by Lamar University SLP   graduate clinician, Destinee Hedspeth.  Artwork by Nathan Cheatham.

Saturday, November 5, 2011

Progressive Verbs and Prepositions with Biscuit

Using Alyssa Satin Capucilli's Bicsuit series to practice progressive (-ing) verbs and prepositions:

Click Here to get these images.  Print them on card stock and cut a slit across the mouths of each animals so the leaves and toys can go "in" the mouth.  Use this for language therapy targeting verbs and prepositions.  
For example:
   put the ball "in the mouth"/"in the tree"/"under the rug"                          
   the cat is "playing"/"climbing"/"hiding"/"running"/"drinking" 

                  
Adapted activity material based on Alyssa Satin Capucilli's Biscuit series created by Lamar graduate Karen Whisenhunt Saar.

vocabulary, consonant clusters, and sequencing



This activity used the yard work theme from Just Helping My Dad by Mercer Mayer to target multiple speech and language goals such as vocabulary, sequencing and consonant cluster production.

Some clusters from the activity pictured above: gloves, stop sign, stars, spray, grass, (blue) sky, (black) sky, and tree.


Activity created by Lamar University SLP graduate clinician, Destinee Hedspeth.  Artwork by Nathan Cheatham.

Friday, November 4, 2011

Prepositions "in" and "on" with The Hungry Giant

Based on The Hungry Giant's Lunch by Joy Cowley:

Practice expressive and receptive use of prepositions after reading this book.
Using felt or magnetic paper cut out food items from the book.  Make a hole in the giant's mouth for the kids to put the food "in" (see hamburger above) and a table to put the food "on" (under, behind or next to).  Practice having them follow directions and then have them describe where the items are.

Adapted material based on literature by Joy Cowley, and created by Karen Whisenhunt Saar, graduate of the Lamar University SLP program.

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Very Hungry Caterpillar activity to target language and vocabulary

Very Hungry Caterpillar activity to target language, vocabulary, and sequencing. Make a caterpillar out of felt (just cut it out freestyle to resemble something like the caterpillar). Then cut a hole to "feed the caterpillar." The puppet has a place for your hand and for the food the child feeds the caterpillar. Use this during the story to feed the caterpillar and then to sequence at the end. To extend the activity, make a caterpillar out of an egg carton using pipe cleaners and paint.





Adapted material created by Lamar University speech-language pathology graduate clinician, Maya Janousek, based on the book The Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

Graphic Organizer for The Red Rose






Gate graphic organizer designed for The Red Rose by Joy Cowley. This can be used for story sequencing, wh- questions, sight words, adjectives and more.






Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology graduate, Kelli Renfro, M.S.

"Pull-ing Weeds" present progressive -ing garden

Pull-ing Weeds Garden (originally made as a complement to "The Red Rose" by Joy Cowley to work on present progressive -ing.)

Made with: shoe box, brown felt, dollar store flowers, pipe cleaners, and picture representations of verbs.

Submitted by Lamar University Speech Language Pathology alumna, Kelli Renfro, M.S.

Portable Communication Strips


These portalble communication strips on a book ring are used as a self prompt for clients who rely on imitation or might need an AAC device.  They can be activity specific or basic vocabulary for expression of needs and wants.



Pair a functional sign with one of the vocabulary words on a strip.
   --"go" + point to train
   --"eat" + point to food
   --"want"  "my"  "on/off"  "open"





Submitted by Lamar University SLP alumna, Kelli Renfro, M.S.

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Categorization for Adult TBI or Dementia Clients


Here is an easy functional task that targets categorization recently used with a TBI client.  Bring in bags of empty items from a grocery store and have client help put away the groceries based on whether they go in the kitchen (more specifically pantry or refrigerator) or the bathroom cabinet.  Obviously this task can be repeated with many types of household items and the categories can be as broad or specific as needed.



Submitted by Lamar University Speech-Language Pathology program graduate Karen Whisenhunt Saar.

Monday, October 31, 2011

Indoor Gardening

This is a simple, any-weather, indoor gardening activity that targets categorization, following directions and spatial orientation.  It can easily be modified for complexity.

Created by Karen Whisenhunt Saar, graduate of Lamar University's speech-language and hearing program.

Automatic Speech

Have client repeat common phrases and fill in the last word or few words themselves.  


Created by Karen Whisenhunt Saar, graduate of the Lamar University speech-language and hearing department.

Prepositions and action verbs with Smarty Pants

Targeting prepositions and action verbs with Joy Cowley's Smarty Pants.


Adapted material created by Lamar University speech-language pathology graduate clinician, Destinee Hedspeth, based on Joy Cowley's Smarty Pants series.


Friday, October 28, 2011

Sound Blending Bread





These bread slices go well with vocabulary from a Little Red Hen lesson and can be used for sound/letter identification and blending.






Created by Jennifer Yancey, graduate clinician at the Lamar University speech-language pathology clinic.

CVC and Decoding Folder Activity

This simple folder activity can be used for sound blending and also for deleting.  


Point to the initial consonant such as "c" then the ask the children, "what sound does this make?" Then ask the children to add it to the rime ending is, such as "ap" and blend them together to make target word "cap". The initial consonant is removable to show in isolation first, then moved over when blended together to make the target word.  This could also be used to do the reverse asking, "What is cat without /k/?"

Created by Karen Whisenhunt Saar, graduate of the Lamar University speech-language pathology program.

Pumpkin Sight Word Memory Game

 Sight word bingo to accompany It's Pumpkin Time by Zoe Hall



Created by Kim Hudler, graduate clinician at the Lamar University speech-langauge pathology clinic.

Blending and Deleting Puzzle

Children will have puzzle pieces with individual words on them.  They will be asked to combine two pieces to make a new word.  Later they can practice breaking the compound words into two separate words.
Created by Kim Hudler and Karen Whisenhunt Saar, graduates of the Lamar University Speech-Langauge Pathology program.